Medical Glossary

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19156
medical terms

Cytosis






Cytosis

1. Suffix referring to cells, as in anisocytosis (inequality in the size of red blood cells), elliptocytosis (elliptical red cells), and phagocytosis (ingestion of cells). 2. Suffix connoting an increase in cells, as in leukocytosis (increase in white blood cells) and lymphocytosis (increase in lymphocytes).

RELATED TERMS
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Anisocytosis
"Excessive inequality in the size of the red blood cells. Anisocytosis (""aniso"") is apparent on a blood smear. From aniso-, meaning unequal + -cytosis, referring to cells."

Blood
The life-maintaining fluid which is made up of plasma, red blood cells (erythrocytes), white blood cells (leukocytes), and platelets; blood circulates through the body's heart, arteries, veins, and capillaries; it carries away waste matter and carbon dioxide, and brings nourishment, electrolytes, hormones, vitamins, antibodies, heat, and oxygen to the tissues.

Elliptocytosis
Hematologic disorder characterized by elliptically shaped red blood cells (elliptocytosis) with variable breakup of red cells (hemolysis) and varying degrees of anemia. Inherited as a dominant trait. Due to mutation (change) in one of the genes encoding proteins of the red cell membrane skeleton.

Phagocytosis
The engulfment of a particle or a microorganism by leukocytes.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Cyto
A combining form denoting a cell.

Cytochrome oxidase
Histochemical method. Indicator of functional state of neurons as brain derives energy from oxidase metabolism. Used in the discovery of blobs in the visual cortex.

Cytogenetics
The study of chromosomes, the visible carriers of DNA, the hereditary material. Cytogenetics is a fusion science due to joining of cytology (the study of cells) with genetics (the study of inherited variation).

Cytogenetics, clinical
The application of cytogenetics to clinical medicine.

Cytokine
A small protein released by cells that has a specific effect on the interactions between cells, on communications between cells or on the behavior of cells. The cytokines includes the interleukins, lymphokines and cell signal molecules, such as tumor necrosis factor and the interferons, which trigger inflammation and respond to infections.

Cytokines
Peptides which regulate cellular growth, differentiation and activation.

Cytology
The study of cells.

Cytolytic T cell
Cell that kills target cells bearing appropriate antigen within the groove of an MHC class I molecule that is identical to that of the T cell.

Cytomegalovirus
A virus that infects cells and causes them to become enlarged. Babies infected with the virus develop mental and sensory disorders.

Cytomegalovirus infection
A common viral infection transmitted by saliva, breast milk, or urine.Relatively rare and relatively mild, the infection does occasionally causedeafness and neurological problems in newborns.

Cytomegaly
Marked enlargement of cells.

Cytomel
Cytomel is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): liothyronine sodium.

Cytometry, flow
Analysis of biological material by detection of the light-absorbing or fluorescing properties of cells or subcellular fractions such as chromosomes passing in a narrow stream through a laser beam. Flow cytometry is used with automated sorting devices to sort successive droplets of the stream into different fractions depending on the fluorescence emitted by each droplet.

Cytoplasm
The living matter within a cell (excluding the nucleus) that is responsible for the function of the cell (for example, protein synthesis).

Cytosar-u
Cytosar-u is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): cytarabine.

Cytosine
One of the pyrimidine nitrogenous bases occurring in both DNA and RNA.

Cytosine (C)
One member of the G-C (guanine-cytosine) pair of bases in DNA.

Cytoskeleton
System of protein filaments in the cytoplasm of a eukaryotic cell that gives the cell a polarized shape and the capacity for directed movement. Its most abundant components are actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments.

Cytotec
Cytotec is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): misoprostol.

Cytotoxic
Capable of killing cells.

Cytotoxic T cell
Cell that kills target cells bearing appropriate antigen within the groove of an MHC class I molecule that is identical to that of the T cell.

Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte
A T cell that is antigen-specific and is able to search out and kill specific types of virus-infected cells. When cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) find cells carrying the viral peptide they are looking for, they induce these cells to secrete proteins that attract nearby macrophages (a type of white blood cells). These macrophages then surround and destroy the infected cells. CTLs are important in the body's response to viruses and cancer.

Cytovene
Cytovene is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): ganciclovir.

Cytovene iv
Cytovene iv is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): ganciclovir sodium.

Cytoxan
Cytoxan is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): cyclophosphamide .



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Cytogenetics
The study of chromosomes, the visible carriers of DNA, the hereditary material. Cytogenetics is a fusion science due to joining of cytology (the study of cells) with genetics (the study of inherited variation).

Cytogenetics, clinical
The application of cytogenetics to clinical medicine.

Cytokine
A small protein released by cells that has a specific effect on the interactions between cells, on communications between cells or on the behavior of cells. The cytokines includes the interleukins, lymphokines and cell signal molecules, such as tumor necrosis factor and the interferons, which trigger inflammation and respond to infections.

Cytometry, flow
Analysis of biological material by detection of the light-absorbing or fluorescing properties of cells or subcellular fractions such as chromosomes passing in a narrow stream through a laser beam. Flow cytometry is used with automated sorting devices to sort successive droplets of the stream into different fractions depending on the fluorescence emitted by each droplet.

Cytosine (C)
One member of the G-C (guanine-cytosine) pair of bases in DNA.

Cytosis

Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte
A T cell that is antigen-specific and is able to search out and kill specific types of virus-infected cells. When cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) find cells carrying the viral peptide they are looking for, they induce these cells to secrete proteins that attract nearby macrophages (a type of white blood cells). These macrophages then surround and destroy the infected cells. CTLs are important in the body's response to viruses and cancer.

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This dictionary contains 19156 terms.